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Talk To Frank

More Regarding Talk To Frank

Converse with Frank is the extensive running anti-drug movement the UK has had. Yet, has it halted anybody taking drugs?

Ten years prior a police Swat group collided with a calm suburban kitchen and transformed the substance of medication education in the UK until the end of time. Out went horrid notices of how medications could "mess you up" and sincere appeals to oppose the vile pushers prowling in each play area. Instead, wit and fun including games were embraced.


In the first advertisement a teenager phoned a police team to detain his mother when she proposed that they had a peaceful discussion regarding drugs. There was also a new message: Drugs are illegal. Talking about the isn't. So talk to Frank."


Frank: A Pleasant Private Drug Counsel

One can actually say that Frank which was a brain child of "Mother" ad firm became the new National Drugs Helpline It was intended to be a put stock in "elder brother" assumes that youngsters could swing to for advice concerning illegal substances. In the bid to make the Frank label a very popular one among the young people in the country, programs like the tour round a brain house, and Pablo the canine drugs mule were all incorporated.


According to Justin Tindal, the creative director of Leo Burnett the ad agency, what is of more importance is the fact that no-one ever saw Frank physically, so it was difficult for mockers to pick on him or blame him for not treating the kids right. Even the sham Frank videos on YouTube are moderately deferential. As there is nothing that remotely suggests Frank is a government project, the campaign is viewed as a first occurrence funded by the government.

Right from the days of Nancy Reagan, a lot has been done about drugs education, and the Grange Hill cast which a lot of people opine that it did more harm than good, simply encouraged people to "Just Say No" to drugs.


Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. In nations with solid punishments for ownership, pictures of jail bars and disgraced guardians are still typical. You play, you pay. is the ad used to warn young people going for night clubbing in Singapore.

In the UK, the government has burned through millions on Above the Influence, a long-running movement that urges positive contrasting options to drug usage utilizing a blend of amusement and useful examples. The accentuation is on conversing with youngsters in their own particular dialect - one promotion demonstrates a group of "stoners" marooned on a couch. But the drug fuelled descent into hell and scare tactics are still used by a surprisingly large number of campaigns around the world. The DrugsNot4Me series recently launched a commercial in Canada that shows a beautiful, self-assured young lady metamorphosis after using "drugs" into a shaking, hollow-eyed mess.

Research that was done on a UK anti-drug campaign between 1999 and 2004 shows that describing the negative effects of abuse will often actually encourage young people "on the margins of society" to use drugs.


By demonstrating how the drugs affect the use, giving the highs and lows, Frank was not supported by the Conservative politicians on the new path it had taken.


An early online advertisement told people that cocaine made you feel on of the world.

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. According to the then creative director of digital agency Profero, Matt Powell, who designed the ad, he was wrong in believing that a normal web user has an adequate attention span. There will be many who could not have seen the adverse effects of the drugs at the end of the animation. The idea behind the ad according to Powell is to make the Frank brand a more honest one by being sincere to teenagers about drugs.

A 67% of the youth say they would ask Frank for advice related to drugs according to the Home Office. The Frank helpline received 225,892 calls and the website received 3,341,777 visits between 2011 and 2012. These figures provide proof that the Frank approach bears results.

But, we don't have any proofs that people have quit drug consumption because of Frank, just as we don't have such evidence in cases of other media campaigns against drugs.

During the decade that the Frank campaign was introduced, drug abuse figures in the UK have reduced by 9%; however, much of the decline has been attributed to a reduction in the use of cannabis as the more youth shun smoking tobacco.


Frank - What Is It?

FRANK is a national drug education program that was established at the Home Office of the British Government and the Department of Health in 2003. It's supposed to reduce the use of illegal and legal substances by teaching teens about the possible effects of alcohol and drugs. A lot of media campaigns have been put out on both the radio and the internet.


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Services

Available services at FRANK for those who seek help about drugs include:

  • The FRANK website
  • A confidential telephone number, available 24 hours a day
  • Email help
  • A live private chat service that's available from 2 pm - 6 pm every day
  • A service to help find appropriate counselling or treatment